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Affiliated Faculty

Dr. Kwabena Boahen

Academic Co-Director

Dr. Boahen's research interests include mixed-mode multichip VLSI models of biological sensory and perceptual systems, their epigenetic development, and asynchronous digital communication for reconfigurable connectivity. Dr. Boahen is using silicon integrated circuits to understand the way neurons compute, linking the seemingly disparate fields of electronics and computer science with neurobiology and medicine. His numerous contributions to the field of neuromorphic engineering include a silicon retina that could be used to give the blind sight and a silicon chip that emulates the way the juvenile brain wires itself up.

Dr. Marco Pavone

Academic Co-Director

Dr. Marco Pavone is an Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, where he is the Director of the Autonomous Systems Laboratory and Co-Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford. Before joining Stanford, he was a Research Technologist within the Robotics Section at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received a Ph.D. degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010. His main research interests are in the development of methodologies for the analysis, design, and control of autonomous systems, with an emphasis on self-driving cars, autonomous aerospace vehicles, and future mobility systems. He is a recipient of several awards, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President Barack Obama, an ONR Young Investigator Award, an NSF CAREER Award, and a NASA Early Career Faculty Award. He was identified by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) as one of America's 20 most highly promising investigators under the age of 40. His work has been recognized with best paper nominations or awards at the International Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, at the Field and Service Robotics Conference, at the Robotics: Science and Systems Conference, and at NASA symposia.

Dr. Fu-Kuo Chang

Affiliated Faculty

Professor Chang's primary research interest is in the areas of multi-functional materials and intelligent structures with particular emphases on structural health monitoring, intelligent self-sensing diagnostics, and integrated health management for space and aircraft structures as well safety-critical assets and medical devices. His specialties include sensors and sensor network development, built-in self-diagnostics,  integrated diagnostics and prognostics, damage tolerance and failure analysis for composite materials, and advanced multi-physics computational methods for multi-functional structures. Most of his work involves system integration and multi-disciplinary engineering in structural mechanics, electrical engineering, signal processing, and multi-scale fabrication of materials. His recent research topics include: Integrated health management for aircraft structures, bio-inspired intelligent sensory materials for fly-by-feel autonomous vehicles, active sensing diagnostics for composite structures, self-diagnostics for high-temperature materials, etc.

Professor Martin Fischer

Affiliated Faculty and SEED Grant Recipient

Martin is known globally for his work and leadership in developing virtual 4D modeling methods to improve project planning, enhance facility performance, increase the productivity of project teams, and further the sustainability of the built environment. His award winning research results have been used by many small and large industrial and government organizations around the world. He has lived, worked, consulted, and taught in Europe, South America, North America, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. At Stanford, he is the Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering, serves as the Director of the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering and a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy. He holds a Diplôme d’Ingénieur in Civil Engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, a M.S. in Industrial Engineering and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Stanford University. He received the CAREER award from the National Science Foundation and was named a top 25 Newsmaker by Engineering News Record in 1996, won best paper awards at the Artificial Intelligence in Design (AID) conference in 2000 and from the ASCE Journal on Computing in Civil Engineering in 2002 and the ASCE Journal of Architectural Engineering in 2014. He is a Senior Fellow of the Design Futures Council and was elected as a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences in 2012.

Rishee Jain, Ph.D.

Affiliated Faculty

Professor Jain's research focuses on the development of data-driven and socio-technical solutions to sustainability problems facing the urban built environment. His work lies at the intersection of civil engineering, data analytics and social science.  Recently, his research has focused on understanding the socio-spatial dynamics of commercial building energy usage, conducting data-driven benchmarking and sustainability planning of urban buildings and characterizing the coupled dynamics of urban systems using data science and micro-experimentation.  Rishee earned his BS in Civil & Environmental Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and his MS/PhD from Columbia University as part of a joint a IGERT program between civil engineering and urban planning.

Professor Doug McAdam

Affiliated Faculty

Professor McAdam is currently working on three major research projects. The first is an comprehensive follow-up study of all accepted applicants to the Teach for America (TFA) Program between 1993-1998. The study is primarily interested in assessing the longer-term “civic effects” of the TFA experience. The second project seeks to understand the factors that shape county-level variation in arson attacks on churches in the U.S. between 1996-2001. The specific question of interest is whether a history of racial conflict in the county is related to the burning of African-American churches. Finally, Professor McAdam is collaborating with Professor Rob Sampson (sociology, Harvard) in an ongoing study of neighborhood activism in Chicago between 1970-2005. The goal is to better understand the structural factors and dynamic processes that shape the capacity of neighborhood groups to organize and act on their own behalf.

 

Jenna Davis, MPH, Ph.D.

Affiliated Faculty

Jennifer (“Jenna”) Davis, MPH, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Higgins-Magid Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, both of Stanford University. Davis’ research and teaching is focused at the interface of engineered water supply and sanitation systems and their users in developing countries. With a background in public health, infrastructure planning, and environmental science & engineering, Davis explores questions regarding interventions that trigger household investment in water, sanitation, and hygiene; the features of water and sanitation services that users value and why; and the health and economic impacts of water supply and sanitation improvements. She has conducted field research in more than a dozen countries, including most recently Kenya, Mozambique, and Bangladesh. Over the past five years, approximately 25 graduate students and post-docs have obtained training in the field with Davis's projects. Davis received a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences from the University of Texas at Austin, and an MSPH in Public Health and PhD in Environmental Sciences and Engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Professor Michael Lepech

Affiliated Faculty

Professor Lepech's research focuses on the integration of sustainability indicators into engineering design, ranging from materials design, structural design, system design, to operations management. Such sustainability indicators include a comprehensive set of environmental, economic, and social costs. Recently his research has focused on the design of sustainable high performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) and fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs), the impacts of sustainable materials on building and infrastructure design and operation, and the development of new life cycle assessment (LCA) applications for building systems, transportation systems, water systems, consumer products. Along with this he is studying the effects that slowly diffusing sustainable civil engineering innovations, and the social networks they diffuse through, can have on achieving long term sustainability goals.